Recent Changes

Tuesday, February 16

  1. page home edited ... Project Presentations/Papers/Collaborations: This project was presented at the Textile Societ…
    ...
    Project Presentations/Papers/Collaborations:
    This project was presented at the Textile Society of America’s (TSA) Biennial Symposium in Los Angeles, California, September 10-14, 2014. The paper associated with this presentation is available through the TSA Symposium Proceedings hosted on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Digital Commons. Click HERE to access the paper: Wikispaces: Technology, Textiles, and Public Engagement. My presentation at the 2014 TSA symposium also connected me to two wonderful researchers, Dr. Lynne Anderson and Dr. Susanne Lervad, and the digital archives they are working to develop. Dr. Lynne Anderson is the Project Director for the Sampler Archive Project and Dr. Susanne Lervad is part of a team developing the terminology wiki, TEXTILnet.
    ...
    funded survey wascompletedwas completed in October
    I am also working on a new collaborative wiki project: The Reverand Andrew C. Strachan Crazy Quilt, that documents a crazy quilt made in April 1900 to commemorate Rev. Strachan's graduation from seminary school. This project was presented at the Small Museum Association meeting in Maryland, February 16, 2015. This wiki is now public and the quilt was donated to South County Museum in November 2015. The goal is to provide a historic and cultural context for the quilt to be used by the family, the South County Museum where it will be housed, and the San Anselmo Historical Museum, which has contributed a significant amount of information to the wiki regarding the quilters and the community from which the quilt came. The Strachan Crazy Quilt is scheduled to be exhibit at the South County Museum's 31st Annual Folk Art Quilt Show in September 2016. If you are in South County Rhode Island, we invite you to come visit.
    Research Project : Wikispaces: Technology, Engagement, and Pedagogy
    Principal Investigator: Blaire Gagnon, M.S., M.A., PhD
    I invite you to view, comment, and use this site as a resource for your own projects and research. I am also asking if you would be willing to provide feedback on this project by participating in a URI research project, which asks that you complete a short, anonymous online survey.
    Please click the title of the research project above to access the online survey. Thank you for your interest, time and participation.

    Sincerely,
    Blaire Gagnon, PhD
    (view changes)
    12:56 pm

Monday, February 8

  1. page home edited ... Because this is a course and faculty developed project designed to engage current trends in th…
    ...
    Because this is a course and faculty developed project designed to engage current trends in the democratization of knowledge, I have also included on this site the initial syllabus, the current course syllabus, and some examples of the anonymous course reviews I collected at the end of the first two course offerings.
    Now for a disclaimer: The wiki pages that are currently included in this site are developed by undergraduates, primarily freshman and sophomores, who are taking the TMD 224Honors course as a General Education course. Only a few students are majors. Generally, this is their first experience at object-based research, textile research and wiki writing. This means the level of production will vary, but that, in my humble opinion, is not a negative nor counter to my goal of making this site accessible. Each page will list the author(s)/researchers, the courses in which the research was conducted, if applicable, and any other information needed for visitors to assess the information presented.
    ...
    experiment at 401-874-5858 {resource://skype_ff_extension-at-jetpack/skype_ff_extension/data/call_skype_logo.png} 401-874-5858 or
    Project Presentations/Papers/Collaborations:
    This project was presented at the Textile Society of America’s (TSA) Biennial Symposium in Los Angeles, California, September 10-14, 2014. The paper associated with this presentation is available through the TSA Symposium Proceedings hosted on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Digital Commons. Click HERE to access the paper: Wikispaces: Technology, Textiles, and Public Engagement. My presentation at the 2014 TSA symposium also connected me to two wonderful researchers, Dr. Lynne Anderson and Dr. Susanne Lervad, and the digital archives they are working to develop. Dr. Lynne Anderson is the Project Director for the Sampler Archive Project and Dr. Susanne Lervad is part of a team developing the terminology wiki, TEXTILnet.
    ...
    and Design Department.Department, and local museums including the Babcock-Smith House Museum in Westerly, Rhode Island and the South County Museum located in Narragansett, Rhode Island. In support
    ...
    this initiative, my TA and I are conductingwe conducted a statewide
    ...
    private collections. We have recently receivedThis survey was supported by a grant
    ...
    the Humanities in support of; the survey.grant funded survey wascompleted in October 2015 but we are still working to contact sites.
    I am
    ...
    16, 2015. In the next few weeks, thisThis wiki will becomeis now public and the quilt was donated to a local museum.South County Museum in November 2015. The goal
    ...
    quilt came. The Strachan Crazy Quilt is scheduled to be exhibit at the South County Museum's 31st Annual Folk Art Quilt Show in September 2016. If you are in South County Rhode Island, we invite you to come visit.
    Research Project : Wikispaces: Technology, Engagement, and Pedagogy
    Principal Investigator: Blaire Gagnon, M.S., M.A., PhD
    (view changes)
    12:56 pm

Monday, February 1

  1. page TMD 224 Honors Spring 2016 Syllabus edited ... of Rhode Island College IslandCollege of Human Science and Services Spring ServicesSpr…
    ...
    of Rhode Island
    College
    IslandCollege of Human Science and Services
    Spring
    ServicesSpring 2016 TMD
    Required Text:
    Lynch, Annette and Mitchell Strauss, 2014. Ethnic Dress in the United States: a cultural
    ...
    3. to introduce students to their own cultural biases and foster an understanding of cultural diversity through the study of dress and appearance.
    5. to explore culture, dress, and appearance through object-based research
    Grading:
    2 Exams 50%
    Final Presentations 10%
    HTTC Object Research/Wiki Page 40%
    Total 100%
    Grading Scale:
    Final grades will be determined using the following percentages. Note: I do not curve!
    93 - 100 % A 77 - 79 % C+
    90 - 92 % A- 73 - 76 % C
    87 - 89 % B+ 70 - 72 % C-
    83 - 86 % B 67 - 69 % D+
    80 - 82 % B- 60 - 66 % D
    59 % and below F

    Explanation of Assignments and Course Information:
    ...
    and Films: TheThe readings are
    Examination: There will be 2 exams for this course: a midterm and a final. The exams will be developed using a variety of reflective assessments including short answer, object/image identification, short essay, matching, multiple choice etc. The format of make-up exams is up to the instructor and is usually different from the scheduled exam. Excuses for missed exams must have documentation and meet university requirements for make-ups, travel plans for example are not a valid excuse.
    Participation, class attendance and courtesy is expected. Students are expected to attend all classes, arrive on time, complete all readings and assignments, and actively participate in all class discussions. Your consistent attendance is expected, as is your participation in class discussions. Arriving late and leaving early are disruptive to class. Do not make it a habit. If you must leave early, try to sit near the door, inform me ahead of time as a courtesy, and disrupt your fellow students as little as possible. If you are sick, particularly with a fever, do not come to class. We must be very vigilant in terms of illness transmission; however, this does not excuse you from your course responsibilities. Communication between the professor and student is very important. Please feel free to contact me or our TA, Kristin, to discuss any issues you are having with your participation in this class. Using the instructor tool in the sakai message will send your message to both Kristin and I.
    ...
    On our Sakai site, you will find documents such as a copy of the syllabus. I will use this site to post announcements and send messages regarding the course. I will also use Sakai to post your grades; you should check these grade postings often to verify that your grades have been posted accurately. Mistakes are made; it is the student’s responsibility to monitor that their grades have been posted accurately. Notify us if grade postings are in question. Accessing Sakai is part of your course participation and is required. There is no excuse not to be aware of course procedures if you attend class and check Sakai regularly. It is suggested that you check the Sakai site daily or at least several times per week.
    Additional Policies:
    ...
    those constraints.
    Students

    Students
    with Documented
    ...
    of students.
    Academic

    Academic
    Enhancement Center
    ...
    or call 401-874-2367 {resource://skype_ff_extension-at-jetpack/skype_ff_extension/data/call_skype_logo.png} 401-874-2367.
    Plagiarism: When you present ideas or words of others as your own, you are plagiarizing. In this course, as in all of your courses, you must identify the authors whose ideas and words you are incorporating into your writing. We will be using the Chicago Manual of Style for our citations this semester. A quick guide is available through our Sakai site or through this link: http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html. If you plagiarize you risk receiving a 0 for the assignment, potential failure of this course, and disciplinary action.
    Diversity and Respect: The following statement has been provided by the Dean of HSS and is an appropriate way to conclude this section of the syllabus, particularly since learning to appreciate diversity is an important aspect of this course: URI Cornerstone: we respect the rights and dignity of each individual and group. We reject prejudice and intolerance, and we work to understand differences. Each member of the University community has the responsibility to foster an environment of acceptance, mutual respect, and understanding. If you are a target or a witness of a bias incident, you are encouraged to contact the URI Bias Response Team www.uri.edu/student_abuse/brt where you will find people and resources to help.
    ...
    Week 2
    Tues. Feb. 2 Fieldwork Exercise
    ...
    Feb. 4 ObjectObject Day 1:
    Comparative image assignment, description, incorporation of donor
    record
    ...
    Due: Wiki page created, description and image posted
    Week 5
    ...
    Southern Belle
    Thurs. Feb. 25 Discussion Southern Belle
    Gender
    ...
    Week 7
    Tues. Mar.8 Film: Darker Side of Fair
    ...
    and Race
    Thurs. Mar. 10 Ethnicity and Race
    Week 8
    ...
    Week 10
    Tue. Mar. 29 Sub-Cultural/Counter-Cultural Identity
    ...
    10 sources
    Thurs.

    Thurs.
    Mar. 31 Sub-Cultural/Counter-cultural identity
    Week 11
    Tues. Apr. 5 Film: Unveiled
    ...
    Thurs. Apr. 28 Presentations
    Due: Final Wiki Research Project Page
    Final Exam: Thursday May 12, 2016 3pm-6pm
    (view changes)
    11:54 am
  2. page TMD 224 Honors Spring 2016 Syllabus edited University of Rhode Island College of Human Science and Services Spring 2016 TMD 224 Honors: Cul…
    University of Rhode Island
    College of Human Science and Services
    Spring 2016 TMD 224 Honors: Culture, Dress and Appearance
    Required Text:
    Lynch, Annette and Mitchell Strauss, 2014. Ethnic Dress in the United States: a cultural
    Encyclopedia .
    Course Description:
    This course explores dress and appearance as a cultural construction and meaning system through the reading of complex texts, discussion of contemporary issues, and object based research and writing. This course meets the General Education requirements for Foreign Language/Cross-cultural Competence and Social Sciences. The integrated skills that it focuses on are examining human difference, reading complex texts, and the use of information technologies.
    Course Goals:
    1. to introduce students to the role of dress as a form of nonverbal communication that engages both social norms and individual desires
    2. to examine how and why culture shapes dress and appearance
    3. to introduce students to their own cultural biases and foster an understanding of cultural diversity through the study of dress and appearance.
    5. to explore culture, dress, and appearance through object-based research
    Grading:
    2 Exams 50%
    Final Presentations 10%
    HTTC Object Research/Wiki Page 40%
    Total 100%
    Grading Scale:
    Final grades will be determined using the following percentages. Note: I do not curve!
    93 - 100 % A 77 - 79 % C+
    90 - 92 % A- 73 - 76 % C
    87 - 89 % B+ 70 - 72 % C-
    83 - 86 % B 67 - 69 % D+
    80 - 82 % B- 60 - 66 % D
    59 % and below F
    Explanation of Assignments and Course Information:
    Readings and Films: The readings are outlined in the course schedule, but are subject to change depending on how quickly we move through the material. A detailed excel sheet can be found under the resource function. Films are included to expand upon the cultural diversity you are exposed to in your readings and to bring to life the everyday practices of dress and appearance. All readings, lectures, films etc will be included on the exams.
    Examination: There will be 2 exams for this course: a midterm and a final. The exams will be developed using a variety of reflective assessments including short answer, object/image identification, short essay, matching, multiple choice etc. The format of make-up exams is up to the instructor and is usually different from the scheduled exam. Excuses for missed exams must have documentation and meet university requirements for make-ups, travel plans for example are not a valid excuse.
    Participation, class attendance and courtesy is expected. Students are expected to attend all classes, arrive on time, complete all readings and assignments, and actively participate in all class discussions. Your consistent attendance is expected, as is your participation in class discussions. Arriving late and leaving early are disruptive to class. Do not make it a habit. If you must leave early, try to sit near the door, inform me ahead of time as a courtesy, and disrupt your fellow students as little as possible. If you are sick, particularly with a fever, do not come to class. We must be very vigilant in terms of illness transmission; however, this does not excuse you from your course responsibilities. Communication between the professor and student is very important. Please feel free to contact me or our TA, Kristin, to discuss any issues you are having with your participation in this class. Using the instructor tool in the sakai message will send your message to both Kristin and I.
    Electronic devices such as cell phones are not to be used in class. Please put them on vibrate and leave them in your backpacks/purses. Laptops are only allowed as long as they are not a distraction and the student is not using the internet during class time in ways that are not specifically related to class. Failure to follow classroom technology etiquette will result in the confiscation of the technology until the end of the class period and could result in it being barred from use in class.
    Sakai: This course has a Sakai site. We will use this site for information dissemination, and intra-course communication, and to develop your wiki pages. As noted above, please only email me through Sakai, not my URI email. I receive too much email and this will allow me to keep a record of all correspondences. Also, do not forward your Sakai message to my URI email except in an emergency.
    On our Sakai site, you will find documents such as a copy of the syllabus. I will use this site to post announcements and send messages regarding the course. I will also use Sakai to post your grades; you should check these grade postings often to verify that your grades have been posted accurately. Mistakes are made; it is the student’s responsibility to monitor that their grades have been posted accurately. Notify us if grade postings are in question. Accessing Sakai is part of your course participation and is required. There is no excuse not to be aware of course procedures if you attend class and check Sakai regularly. It is suggested that you check the Sakai site daily or at least several times per week.
    Additional Policies:
    Student Athletes: All student athletes whose schedule will interfere with their participation in this class must submit an official schedule (i.e. not one printed off the internet) to the instructor ASAP and definitely before missing any class due to a sport commitment. However, turning in a schedule does not preclude the student from reminding the Professor if they will be missing class or an exam that must be made up. We understand that student athletes have additional time pressures, but so do other students who work, participate in musical performances, or those who have children. Everyone is responsible for managing those constraints.
    Students with Documented Disabilities: Any student with a documented disability please feel free to contact me early in the semester so that reasonable accommodations can be put in place to help foster your success in this class. As part of this procedure, you should first contact the Disability Services for Students, Office of Student Life, 330 Memorial Union, 874-2098. Disability Services recommends that notification be done outside of class time in order to protect the confidentiality of students.
    Academic Enhancement Center (AEC). For those seeking additional support in their classes, I encourage you to visit the Academic Enhancement Center (AEC) on the 4th Floor of Roosevelt Hall. Visit their website: http://www.uri.edu/aec/ or call 401-874-2367.
    Plagiarism: When you present ideas or words of others as your own, you are plagiarizing. In this course, as in all of your courses, you must identify the authors whose ideas and words you are incorporating into your writing. We will be using the Chicago Manual of Style for our citations this semester. A quick guide is available through our Sakai site or through this link: http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html. If you plagiarize you risk receiving a 0 for the assignment, potential failure of this course, and disciplinary action.
    Diversity and Respect: The following statement has been provided by the Dean of HSS and is an appropriate way to conclude this section of the syllabus, particularly since learning to appreciate diversity is an important aspect of this course: URI Cornerstone: we respect the rights and dignity of each individual and group. We reject prejudice and intolerance, and we work to understand differences. Each member of the University community has the responsibility to foster an environment of acceptance, mutual respect, and understanding. If you are a target or a witness of a bias incident, you are encouraged to contact the URI Bias Response Team www.uri.edu/student_abuse/brt where you will find people and resources to help.
    Class Schedule:
    Important Note: For Weekly Readings from the text, see the excel sheet posted on sakai for the topic breakdown of text articles that you are responsible for. Nacirema is also on sakai.
    Week/Dates Topic
    Week 1:
    Tues. Jan. 26 Course Introduction: Explanation of Assignments
    Tour of the HTCC/Discussion of Object Choice
    Thurs. Jan. 28 Culture and Dress Nacirema
    Due: Ideas for Object Choices
    Week 2
    Tues. Feb. 2 Fieldwork Exercise
    Thurs. Feb. 4 Object Day 1: Assignment of Objects: Introduction to the Wiki,
    Comparative image assignment, description, incorporation of donor
    record
    Week 3
    Tues. Feb. 9 Social Status
    Thurs. Feb. 11 Social Status
    Week 4
    Tues. Feb 16 Social Status
    Thurs. Feb. 18 Object Day 2: Researching textiles and clothing/annotated bib assignment presented
    Due: Wiki page created, description and image posted
    Week 5
    Tues. Feb. 23 Film: Southern Belle
    Thurs. Feb. 25 Discussion Southern Belle
    Gender
    Week 6
    Tues. Mar. 1 Gender
    Thurs. Mar. 3 Gender
    Object Day 3: Citing in the Wiki
    Due: Annotated Bib Part 1: Discussion of 2 sources
    Week 7
    Tues. Mar.8 Film: Darker Side of Fair
    Ethnicity and Race
    Thurs. Mar. 10 Ethnicity and Race
    Week 8
    Tues. Mar. 15 HTCC Objects/Exam Review
    Thurs. Mar. 17 Midterm!!
    Week 9
    SPRING BREAK MARCH 21-25 NO CLASSES!!!
    Week 10
    Tue. Mar. 29 Sub-Cultural/Counter-Cultural Identity
    Due: Annotated Bib 10 sources
    Thurs. Mar. 31 Sub-Cultural/Counter-cultural identity
    Week 11
    Tues. Apr. 5 Film: Unveiled
    Thurs. Apr. 7 Faith/Religion
    Final Presentation Groups Assigned
    Week 12
    Tues. Apr. 12 Faith/Religion
    Due: Draft Wiki page based on object research
    Thurs Apr. 14 Faith/Religion
    Week 13
    Tue. Apr. 19 Political Identity
    Thurs. Apr. 21 Political Identity
    Week 14
    Tues. Apr. 26 Presentations/Course Evaluations
    Thurs. Apr. 28 Presentations
    Due: Final Wiki Research Project Page
    Final Exam: Thursday May 12, 2016 3pm-6pm

    (view changes)
    11:52 am
  3. page Course Materials edited ... Course Materials January 20, 2016 ... student work. I am including the rubrics for the wi…
    ...
    Course Materials
    January 20, 2016
    ...
    student work. I am including the rubrics for the wiki research and writing assignments below. I will
    As this wiki begins to grow, so must its navigational sophistication and my own understanding of this process. To simplify matters, I have added this organizational page for the course materials in a manner that makes sense to me, and provides you a link to the individual course material pages. We are heading into the 4th rendition of the TMD 224: Culture, Dress and Appearance Honors section this spring (2016), and this semester I am again using Ethnic Dress in the United States: a cultural encyclopedia. This book's editors are Annette Lynch and Mitchell Strauss. A bit of a disclosure. I participated in this project as a contributor, but am not financially benefiting from its adoption.
    TMD 224 Honors Spring 2016
    (view changes)
    11:49 am
  4. page Course Materials edited ... As this wiki begins to grow, so must its navigational sophistication and my own understanding …
    ...
    As this wiki begins to grow, so must its navigational sophistication and my own understanding of this process. To simplify matters, I have added this organizational page for the course materials in a manner that makes sense to me, and provides you a link to the individual course material pages. We are heading into the 4th rendition of the TMD 224: Culture, Dress and Appearance Honors section this spring (2016), and this semester I am again using Ethnic Dress in the United States: a cultural encyclopedia. This book's editors are Annette Lynch and Mitchell Strauss. A bit of a disclosure. I participated in this project as a contributor, but am not financially benefiting from its adoption.
    TMD 224 Honors Spring 2016
    Wikipage Creation Rubric
    TMD 224 Honors Spring 2015
    Syllabus
    (view changes)
    11:47 am
  5. page Wikipage Creation Rubric edited TMD 224 S16: Wiki Page Creation Rubric Due Date: (No late assignments will be accepted) Name: _…
    TMD 224 S16: Wiki Page Creation Rubric
    Due Date: (No late assignments will be accepted)
    Name: ___
    Each expectation is worth 1 point
    Wiki page creation
    Created using supplied page template
    Page name is logical and clear (FYI, students cannot change the name of a page after it is created, only the instructor, Dr. Gagnon, can.)
    Page has been tagged when created, so that it appears under the objects navigation on the right hand side of the page
    Images
    Student has taken images of their object and uploaded 1 good image to the wikispaces site
    Image is saved with a file name that follows the site guidelines, which say all images must be saved with the accession number and a very short description, example 1999.12.16 Guatemalan belt front
    Image has been inserted into the students wiki page, it is centered or left justified depending on what works best for the image, and it is of an appropriate size (aesthetics matter). Image should be located above the words “Time Period” on the template, not below.
    Image comparison
    Student has found at least 1 image similar to their object to justify what they think the object is. This will help with creating the wiki page name. This image should be linked to the wikipage using the link widget in the edit bar.
    Description
    Student has written a clear and comprehensive description of their object that includes measurements in both inches and centimeters. For example: 6 ½ inches (xxx cm) x 3 inches (xx cm).
    Student has included all of the supplied donor information in the description, and indicated or attributed it as such
    Object Identification information
    Student has filled in all of the information related to Time Period; Category, Accession number; donor
    POINT TOTAL
    /10

    (view changes)
    11:46 am

More